As Orangemen marched in the summer of , Protestant paramilitaries fired on army and police in the worst street riots seen in Belfast foryears Northern Ireland s Chief Constable squarely blamed the Orange Order Published to coincide with the start of themarching season, this extraordinary book opens the lid on this secretive, powerful and beleaguered organisation whose future is inextricably tied to that of the United Kingdom itself Today, the Order has around , active members, increasingly identified with an unyielding, bigoted Unionism Ian Paisley joined at the age ofexpressed in the thousands of marches it stages each year, all too often the flashpoint for violence Orangeism, like Unionism, is at a crossroads, and a long way from the peaceful tolerance it preaches This remarkable book takes the lid off a secret society that has lost its moral direction, but not its capacity for intrigue, influence or coercion Written in sorrow than in anger but with absolute authority, the result is a revelatory volume to stand comparison for its personal bravery and political importance


2 thoughts on “The Orange Order: A Tradition Betrayed

  1. Helena Wallace Helena Wallace says:

    Excellent


  2. S. J S. J says:

    The book warmly recollects the traditional values of the Orange Order and details the author s view of the Institution s sad and ever increasing diversion of them.It s often difficult to find books on NI history without their value being lowered by the author resorting to traditional, tired arguments without any supporting evidence, Rev Brian Kennaway however provides very strong arguments supported by other evidence and opinion.I d recommend this book to anyone who wants to understand what the Order originally stood for as this blows away a lot of the common misperceptions and provides a fascinating view of some of the most seminal events of the organisation from an inside perspective.I thoroughly enjoyed this book and have recommended it to several friends.